Capim

Capim, honey, Mexico (producer)

Capim is a beekeeping organisation with a focus on organic production. The business was created in 2003, when six organisations belonging to Miel Maya (a honey co-operative) decided to expand their scope by integrating honey producers from the entire Mexican territory, and not just the Mayan-influenced Southern states.

Capim produces two different types of honey from the Apis Mellifera bees. ‘Polyfloral’ honey containing nectar from a broad range of plants varying from flowers, herbs, and fruit trees; and ‘Unifloral’ which has a flvour distinct to the one particular plant from which it takes its nectar.

Their mission is to strengthen the trade and export of honey, by supporting small organisations of beekeeper groups, as well as families and communities.

Beekeeper, Macario Lopez Eras, said:

“Financing has been useful because it has allowed us to buy more supplies, increasing our production. For example, in 2017, we harvested only one lot of honey.
Thanks to Shared Interest fiance, we achieved three batches by 2018.”

REACHING NEW MARKETS WITH ORGANIC HONEY

Capim treats bees with the same dignity as human beings. They truly believe that beekeeping is at the core of social improvement.

In 2016, Capim became a Shared Interest customer, when they received a loan to increase production, by increasing the number of hives. They now have over 11,000 beehives, and work with more than 100 honey farmers across Mexico. Shared Interest is Capim’s only supplier of financial support, as they cannot access finance elsewhere.

Unexpected droughts, forest fires and storms hit Capim hard in 2017, causing the loss of four containers of honey. The
crisis also revealed quality issues within some of their member organisations. This discovery motivated them to create their own technical department, employing fie additional staff.

By reacting quickly and creating a new, independent and more professional technical team, Capim has been able to
create strong foundations to support the future growth of the organisation. So far this year, they have grown their exports
considerably thanks to the loan, and it is expected that this will help make the business more sustainable for the future.

Macario continued: “The loan has impacted in three ways: prompt and complete payments to our beekeepers, improved cash flow, and growth in production, exports and member organisations.

“The message we send to Shared Interest investors and volunteers is of a deep gratitude for the work they do in flavour of
the small beekeepers in Mexico.”

Capim now provides training to producer members and external beekeepers on topics such as good agricultural
practices, governance, international trade, fair trade, gender equality, environmental protection and health prevention. Capim is also helping farmers to convert their conventional honey production to organic, so they can receive a higher income and reach niche markets.    
 

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